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Applications Now Open for FOCWG Mellon Mentors Program

The FOCWG invites applications for participation in the inaugural cohort of the FOCWG Mellon Mentors program. The FOCWG Mellon Mentors Program aims to partner early-career BIPOC faculty with trained senior mentors to create enduring professional relationships that will provide guidance, resources, and support to early career scholars as they cement their foothold in academia. The goal of the FOCWG Mellon Mentors Program is the creation of mentoring cohorts that offer multiple models of mentoring and expands the network of support for program participants.

Applications are due July 31, 2021. See the full call for applications for more details.

New England Humanities Consortium Seed Grants. Proposals due September 15, 2021

2021 NEHC Seed Grant Applications Now Open

Applications are now open for the 2021 NEHC seed grants. These competitive seed grants are for research initiatives in the humanities that seek to capitalize on the collaborative network and potential of the consortium. Applications seeking to sustain, and build on, previously funded NEHC initiatives that demonstrated success are also welcome. Awards of up to $5,000 will be made. (For projects whose total budgets exceed $5,000 applicants must list additional committed funding sources and amounts.) Priority will be given to applications demonstrating concrete plans for consortium membership involvement. Such involvement can take different forms, but will typically involve, e.g. direct collaboration between two or more member institutions and/or active solicitation of faculty, staff, or students exclusively from member institutions. Applications are welcome from individuals or teams, but the PI must be on the faculty of a NEHC member institution.

Applications are due September 15, 2021, and must be submitted to your home humanities institute or center. See the request for proposals for full details and submission guidelines.

Call for Applications: 2021 FOCWG Symposium

Funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC), and the University of Connecticut, the Faculty of Color Working Group (FOCWG) invites applications for a virtual symposium hosted by Tufts University scheduled for Wednesday May 26 – Friday May 28, 2021 themed “Politics, Pedagogy, and the Public Humanities.” This community and support-building event for FOC, continues the enthusiasm generated during the first regional FOCWG gathering, on May 10, 2019. The symposium includes a keynote by Dr. Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor (Princeton), workshops by Dr. Noliwe Rooks (Cornell), Dr. Gabrielle Foreman (Penn State), Dr. Kyla Wazana Tompkins (Pomona), and Dr. Nicole Aljoe (Northeastern), social hours, and opportunities for one-on-one meetings with publishers.

Please note that space will be limited to ensure a high level of interaction among all participants, and the application deadline has been extended to April 23, 2021. Please see the full call for applications for details.

Call for Applications: 2021–22 NEHC Faculty of Color Working Group Mellon Faculty Fellowship

With the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the New England Humanities Consortium’s Faculty of Color Working Group is pleased to accept applications for two (2) Mellon Faculty Fellowships in the Humanities and Humanistic Social Sciences for the 2021–2022 academic year. The fellowship is intended for full-time faculty members from historically disadvantaged racial groups or those whose projects specifically confront institutional blocks for BIPOC faculty.

Applicants are limited to faculty from NEHC member institutions, which include Amherst College, Brown University, Colby College, Dartmouth College, Middlebury College, Northeastern University, Smith College, Tufts University, University of Connecticut, University of New Hampshire, University of Rhode Island, University of Vermont, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College.

Applicant eligibility is determined by the following criteria:

  1. Must be faculty at a NEHC member institution
  2. Research must have high relevance for addressing the support needs of and/or issues and obstacles faced by BIPOC faculty at PWIs
  3. Demonstration of a viable research project
  4. A research project in the humanities/humanistic sciences

Criteria for successful applicants include, but are not limited to: quality of research proposal; strength of reference letters; stage of tenure/promotion dossier preparation and fulfillment of tenure and promotion requirements; scholar’s support needs to fulfill these requirements; likelihood of support or failure thereof related to scholar’s professional advancement at home institution; likelihood of applicant to contribute to a larger support network for faculty of color in the region and/or to understanding and addressing the impediments to success for FOC in higher education. Fellows should not teach during the fellowship year.

The Mellon Faculty of Color Fellowship program seeks to relieve scholars of these institutional hindrances by providing resources to reduce many of the barriers that make it difficult for faculty of color to research, think, and engage in their transformative work at their home institutions. These fellowships will provide resources that will allow them the time and space to focus on their scholarship away from the typical demands levied on their own campuses. Fellows will spend their fellowship year at a NEHC host institution with opportunities to interact with a broad and relevant intellectual community.

The Mellon Faculty Fellows will receive a stipend of $40,000 and a $2,500 moving expense if needed. The award funds will be remitted to the successful applicant’s home institution (the institution that formally employs them as faculty), who will use the funds to offset the fellow's salary and benefits. Fellows will be in residence at a host institution (the institution at which the fellow spends the fellowship year). Both institutions must be NEHC members. While the host institution does not pay salary or benefits to the Fellow while they are in residence, they are expected to provide the professional amenities to the visiting Fellow typically granted to visiting faculty and scholars.

The Mellon Fellows will be expected to give at least one public lecture or its equivalent at the hosting institute or center. The lecture will be publicized by the FOCWG and the NEHC.

Each application must contain:

  1. A Short Curriculum Vitae (3 pages max.)
  2. A Proposal Narrative (3 pages/1500 words max.)
  3. A Letter from a NEHC Institute/Center Director indicating support for hosting the fellow during the fellowship year.

To receive full consideration applications should conform to our application guidelines..

All documents must be submitted to Interfolio by February 1, 2021 at 11:59 pm (EST).

Applicants to this position receive a free Interfolio Dossier account and can send all application materials, including confidential letters of recommendation, free of charge.

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Call for Applications: 2021–22 UCHI Faculty of Color Working Group Fellowship

With the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the University of Connecticut, UCHI, together with the Faculty of Color Working Group of the New England Humanities Consortium, is pleased to accept applications for the UCHI/FOCWG Faculty Fellowship for the 2021-2022 academic year. The fellowship is intended for full-time UConn faculty members from historically disadvantaged minority groups and/or those whose projects specifically confront institutional blocks for BIPOC faculty.

Criteria for successful applicants include, but are not limited to: quality of research proposal; strength of reference letters; and articulation within the proposal of how this project can contribute to a larger support network for faculty of color in the region and/or to understanding and addressing impediments to success for BIPOC faculty in higher education.

Applications for the UCHI/FOCWG Fellowship are due on February 1st and should be submitted through UCHI’s regular fellowship application portal on Interfolio. All submission requirements are identical to regular UCHI Humanities fellowships; and applicants will be assessed by the same interdisciplinary review panel of outside academics. When applying, we ask that you indicate on the application form that you would like to be considered for the UCHI/FOCWG Fellowship. Indicating that you would like to be considered for the UCHI/FOCWG Fellowship does not preclude you from being offered a UCHI Fellowship—indeed, any application for the UCHI/FOCWG fellowship is considered as an application for a standard UCHI fellowship.

UCHI/FOCWG Fellows are full members of the UCHI fellowship class and have all the same benefits and responsibilities. See here for fellowship application materials and further information on the fellowship program.

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Open Letter to Dr. Suresh Garimella, President of UVM

The New England Humanities Consortium opposes the proposed cuts to humanities and arts departments at the University of Vermont. To express and explain our strong condemnation of these budget proposals, we have written the below open letter to Dr. Suresh Garimella, President of the University of Vermont.


Dr. Suresh Garimella
President
University of Vermont
Burlington, VT 05405

December 15, 2020

I am writing, on behalf of the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC), of which UVM is a founding member, to protest, in the strongest possible terms, the proposed elimination of and consolidation of several humanities and arts departments at the University of Vermont.

Former President Obama recently noted that the nation is in the midst of an “epistemic crisis”—even as we face a devastating pandemic and unprecedented challenges to our electoral system. We understand that all institutions of higher education face terrible decisions because of the latter two crises.

But we also know that in order to solve the crisis of knowledge and truth eating away at the foundations of our democracy, our students—and the public at large—need the lessons we learn from the study of religion, languages, arts, classics and historical preservation. We can’t understand where we come from, what we value, and how we live while ignoring historic foundations, thinkers like Lao Tzu and Plato and knowledge about the politics and wisdom of religious experience. The state of Vermont—indeed the nation—cannot lose current and future voices who reflect these global lessons and the contributions they will make to a more inclusive and diverse workforce. Without them, we are spiritually, intellectually and civically worse off.

As noted, the University of Vermont has been a regional leader in the humanities and a founding member of the NEHC, an active consortium of public and private institutions throughout the region funding humanities research, engaging in public outreach and implementing a Mellon-funded Faculty of Color Working Group. We look forward to continuing our partnership with the University of Vermont Humanities Center and an undiminished and robust slate of humanities departments at the university.

Therefore, we respectfully implore the University of Vermont to reconsider these proposals.

Sincerely,

Michael P. Lynch
Director, New England Humanities Consortium
Director, University of Connecticut Humanities Institute
Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, University of Connecticut

Darryl Harper
Director, Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Amherst College

Amanda Anderson
Director, Cogut Institute for the Humanities, Brown University

Kerill O’Neill
Director, Center for the Arts and Humanities, Colby College

Rebecca Biron
Director, The Leslie Center for the Humanities, Dartmouth College

Febe Armanios & Marion Wells
Co-Directors, Axinn Center for the Humanites at Middlebury College, Middlebury College

Lori Lefkovitz
Director, Northeastern University Humanities Center, Northeastern University

Alexandra Keller
Director, Kahn Liberal Arts Institute, Smith College

Kamran Rastegar
Director, Center for the Humanities at Tufts, Tufts University

Stephen Trzaskoma
Director, University of New Hampshire Center for the Humanities, University of New Hampshire

Evelyn Sterne
Director, University of Rhode Island Center for the Humanities, University of Rhode Island

Luis Vivanco
Director, The University of Vermont Humanities Center, University of Vermont

Eve Zimmerman
Director, Wellesley’s Newhouse Center for the Humanities, Wellesley College

Domingo Ledezma & Patrick Johnson
Co-Directors, Wheaton Institute for Interdisciplinary Humanities, Wheaton College

Download this letter as a PDF.

UVM Humnaities Center logo

UVM Humanities Center Statement on Proposed Cuts to Humanities

The UVM Humanities Center decries, in the strongest possible terms, the proposal to eliminate humanities departments and programs in the College of Arts and Sciences. This proposal does not reflect a “comprehensive commitment to a liberal arts education” (UVM Vision statement), and it undermines the value of the Humanities for our students, faculty, state, and status as Vermont’s flagship land grant university.

As Vermont Congressman Justin Morrill—architect of the land-grant university system— once expressed, humanities are not marginal to the land grant university but lie at its very heart: “The fundamental idea was to offer an opportunity in every state for a liberal and larger education to larger numbers, not merely those destined to enter the sedentary professions, but to those needing higher instruction for the world’s business, for the industrial pursuits and professions of life.” For Morrill, the purpose of the university is not merely technical education; rather it is to create better citizens and strengthen the nation by enriching the human experience.

Through their teaching, research, and public engagement, the faculty of three humanities programs targeted for elimination—Religion, Classics, and Historic Preservation—as well as majors in various foreign languages targeted for elimination, have demonstrated that the Humanities help all students from across the University to:

  • Understand human experience across language, place, and time
  • Empathize with others
  • Think creatively and critically
  • Examine social problems related to race, gender, sex, sexuality, religion, ethnicity, class, and caste
  • Prioritize social justice and equality
  • Build skills in inquiry, writing and critical analysis, the so-called “soft-skills” that are in high demand in diverse careers

The proposal to eliminate these programs and majors based on an arbitrary measure like the number of majors is short-sighted and ignores the importance of these programs for the fulfilment of general education requirements for all students from across the university. Given that this proposal is patently about opening the door to cutting faculty positions, it egregiously ignores the contributions faculty in these programs make to Vermont through their public humanities work, consulting, and leadership in areas such as cultural heritage management, secondary education, teacher training, and humanities and arts programming throughout the state. UVM’s latest attempt to “engage” with Vermont would do well to recognize Humanities faculty are already deeply engaged in Vermont’s communities through a multitude of humanistic and artistic pursuits. Especially galling is the assault it represents on the accomplishments, productivity, and stature of the faculty who teach in these programs, whose contributions to UVM’s national and international reputation are substantial. We have been proud in the Humanities Center to provide direct support and awards to faculty in each of these programs.

Budgets are not apolitical, they are values statements. It is clear from the proposed budgetary cuts that the humanities are not valued at UVM. This is in spite of their inherent merit to our land grant institution, high enrollment courses that serve university mission, and excellent faculty. We question why we cannot invest university resources in academic programs and not bloated administrator salaries, or reform a budget model that systematically produces regular structural deficits to the academic unit that serves the greatest number and variety of students.

Sincerely,

Luis Vivanco, Director
Ilyse Morgenstein-Fuerst, Associate Director

Download a PDF of the statement

A black and white photo of women in white dresses holding a sign that says Banner State Women's National Baptist Convention. Most of the women are African American, but a few appear to be white.

University of Rhode Island Announces Suffrage Centennial Lecture Series

In 2020 we celebrate two monumental events in American history: the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, granting American women the right to vote, and the 150th anniversary of the 15th Amendment that at least nominally enfranchised African American men. To mark the occasion, URI is planning a yearlong virtual series focused on suffrage history and modern-day voting issues.

Scheduled speakers include: Kenneth Florey, one of the United States’ foremost collectors of women’s suffrage memorabilia; scholar and award-winning author Martha Jones, professor at Johns Hopkins University; Hilary Levey Friedman, a fellow at the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy and president of the Rhode Island chapter of the National Organization for Women; URI professor Kathleen McIntyre; and Rhode Island’s Secretary of State Nellie M. Gorbea. The series is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Honors Program, Women’s Leadership Council, and the Suffrage Centennial Committee.

For a complete list of events please see the Suffrage Centennial Lecture Series’ website.

Faculty of Color Workshop 2019. Photo of all participants posing for pictures on the main front steps of a building.

UConn Humanities Institute Awarded Mellon Grant to Expand the Faculty of Color Working Group

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The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded a three-year grant of $750,000 to the University of Connecticut for the Humanities Institute to expand the New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) Faculty of Color Working Group (FOCWG). The thirteen member institutions of the Consortium support programming in humanities fields such as history, politics, language, art, literature, and philosophy.

Following a 2018 Mellon Foundation $100,000 grant that permitted a pilot phase, faculty of color at NEHC member institutions created and led the Faculty of Color Working Group (FOCWG) for the purpose of increasing mentorship, community building, and dedicated time for scholarly production among faculty of color. Coupled with the development of the NEHC’s social media and publicity, through cross-institutional networks, research and teaching mentorship, and fellowships, the Mellon Foundation grant enables FOCWG to bolster faculty success across schools in the region and the nation.

The Principal investigator for the program is Michael P. Lynch, director of the UConn Humanities Institute, director of NEHC and Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor, Philosophy. Co-principal investigators are Melina Pappademos, director of the UConn Africana Studies Institute, associate professor of history, and director of the Faculty of Color Working Group; and Alexis L. Boylan, director of academic affairs of the UConn Humanities Institute and associate professor of art and art history and Africana Studies.

“With generous support from the Mellon Foundation, this initiative recognizes the environmental obstacles and, at times, outright hostilities to professional advancement that faculty of color face at predominantly white institutions. FOCWG seeks to address these institutional failures by enabling scholarly productivity and professional relationships, even self-care, as safe-guards for aggregated individual success,” says Pappademos. “The FOCWG challenges institutions to dismantle rather than uphold their inflexible structures designed and defended to advantage some faculty members over others.“

In addition to UConn, the consortium includes Amherst College, Colby College, Dartmouth College, Northeastern University, Tufts University, University of New Hampshire, University of Rhode Island, University of Vermont, Wellesley College, and Wheaton College.

The FOCWG provides an urgently needed pathway for faculty of color to navigate the particular challenges they face in academic life. As part of a large network of institutions, the FOCWG grant will develop collaborative fellowship and mentoring opportunities to produce outcomes unachievable by any single institution.

The core activities made possible by the grant include:

  • Organizing an annual conference for faculty of color that will be the centerpiece of activities and outreach, which will include crucial professional dialogues on panel topics such as publishing, tenure and promotion and the challenge of transitioning into administrative roles. The conference will include pre-conference and post-conference interviews and surveys.
  • Development of a mentorship program to identify and train senior faculty mentors throughout the New England Humanities Consortium to offer a resource for faculty of color at all stages of their careers, including those holding administrative positions, in the region.
  • Establishment of The Mellon Faculty of Color Fellowship program, that will create opportunities for faculty to spend a year as a research fellow at another Consortium institution’s humanities institute or center contributing to cross-pollination across the Consortium while furthering faculty’s individual research.

There will also be increased support for NEHC administrative functions including a separate FOCWG website, expanded social media presence and creation of an Instagram account to attract younger generation students and scholars, particularly those who attend liberal arts institutions.

NEHC Announces 2020 Seed Grant Awardees

The New England Humanities Consortium (NEHC) is pleased to announce the winners of the 2020 Requests for Proposals. These are competitive seed grants for research initiatives in the humanities that seek to capitalize on the collaborative network of the consortium.

Curation at a Distance

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Principal Investigator

Lisa Crossman 
Curator, Mead Art Museum
Amherst College

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Collaborator

Dina Deitsch
Chief Curator, Tufts University Art Galleries
Tufts University

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Collaborator

David E. Little
Chief Curator, Mead Art Museum
Amherst College

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Collaborator

Diana Tuite
Curator, Colby College Museum of Art
Colby College

Curating at a Distance is a working group composed of curators at the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College, Tufts University Art Galleries, and Colby College Museum of Art that will research and pilot innovative solutions for presenting artworks and virtual exhibitions online that go beyond digital renderings of physical exhibitions. Through the convening of technical experts in the field and the gathering of ideas from museum colleagues, faculty, academic educators, and artists, the group will develop creative and collaborative pedagogical tools that will become resources for the NEHC.

The group’s convenings will result in a set of guidelines to create cross-institutional virtual exhibitions and meaningful engagement with artworks that speak to contemporary issues relevant to students today. Participating curators will develop a model for the co-creation of valuable teaching resources with input from humanities faculty and will create content collaboratively that will implement the group’s findings.

Working Group:

  • Lisa Crossman, Curator of American Art and Arts of the Americas, Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, MA
  • Dina Deitsch, Director and Chief Curator, Tufts University Art Galleries, Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Medford and Boston, MA
  • David E. Little, John Wieland 1958 Director and Chief Curator, Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, MA
  • Diana Tuite, Katz Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Colby College Museum of Art, Colby College, Waterville, ME

Shade: Labor Diasporas, Tobacco, Mobility, and the Urban Nexus

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Co-Principal Investigator

Jason Oliver Chang 
Associate Professor, History & Asian and Asian American Studies
University of Connecticut

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Co-Principal Investigator

Fiona Vernal
Associate Professor, History & Africana Studies
University of Connecticut

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Collaborator

Jorell Meléndez-Badillo
Assistant Professor, History
Dartmouth College

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Collaborator

Sony Coranez Bolton
Assistant Professor Latinx and Latin American Studies
Amherst College

Shade: Labor Migration, Tobacco, Mobility and the Urban Nexus is an interdisciplinary collective of humanities scholars investigating the ways that U.S. imperialism, colonization, corporate industry, and white settler normativity have evolved and matured in the Connecticut River Valley. The Shade Collective engages interdisciplinary collaborations to center the history and culture of the region’s local communities and global labor diasporas. While migration and labor histories associated with the valley’s tobacco industry remain politically invisible, laborers continue to shape the rural and urban spaces of the region in the course of giving their life meaning. Tobacco laborers attached their own meaning of place and space to their memories and their imaginations of the Connecticut River Valley.

Undisciplining Performance

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Co-Principal Investigator

Lilian Mengesha 
Fletcher Foundation Assistant Professor of Dramatic Literature
Tufts University

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Co-Principal Investigator

AB Brown 
Assistant Professor of Contemporary Performance
Colby College

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Co-Principal Investigator

Kareem Khubchandani 
Mellon Bridge Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre, Dance, & Performance Studies
Tufts University

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Co-Principal Investigator

Christine Mok 
Assistant Professor, Department of English
University of Rhode Island

The 2021 summer seminar “Undisciplining Performance” investigates the role that performance theory and practice play in troubling disciplinary boundaries that perpetuate hierarchies of value around bodies of knowledge and their attendant social formations. Researchers will conduct a 20-day seminar that combines “distance” and “face-to-face” collaboration. The seminar has three missions: the first is to support our interdisciplinary research and teaching, the second is to foster and strengthen intellectual and pedagogical collaboration across consortium member institutions, and the third is to build a regional conversation about the critical role of performance studies for the future of the humanities. As junior faculty from Colby, Tufts, and URI, we are eager to build on the NEHC mission and model of exchange and collaboration to further humanist knowledge of history and theory using performance.

Journal of a Plague Year

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Co-Principal Investigator

Victoria Cain 
Associate Professor, History
Northeastern University

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Co-Principal Investigator

Natalie Valdez 
Assistant Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies
Wellesley College

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Collaborator

Hilary Moss 
Professor of History and Black Studies
Amherst College

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Collaborator

Kristen V. Luschen 
Lewis-Sebring Visiting Professor of Education Studies
Amherst College

A Journal of a Plague Year is a crowdsourced digital archive that aims to create a lasting historical record of the global experience of COVID-19. This archive is an open repository: anyone can explore its holdings, gather and add items, or curate exhibits, maps, and stories based on its collections. The archive is committed to preserving diverse voices in order to represent the breadth and depth of experiences during this uncertain time. Victoria Cain, in association with Natali Valdez, will create course modules designed to help faculty and students use the archive. These modules will promote primary source literacy, an inclusive understanding of local history and narrative, and more sophisticated understandings of ethical archiving and data-inflected storytelling. Students will contribute to the archives in meaningful ways, ensuring the stories of all people, including underrepresented communities, are heard now and in the future.

Maintaining Accessibility and Developing Resources for Keeping It 101: A Killjoy’s Introduction to Religion Podcast

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Principal Investigator

Ilyse Morgenstein-Fuerst 
Associate Professor of Religion and Associate Director, Humanities Center
University of Vermont

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Collaborator

Megan P. Goodwin 
Director for Sacred Writes and Visiting Lecturer, Philosophy and Religion Department
Northeastern University

Keeping it 101: A Killjoy’s Introduction to Religion is the podcast that helps listeners make sense of religion. Why religion? Well, if you read the news, have a body, exist in public, or think about race, gender, class, ability, or sexuality, you likely also think about religion — even if you don’t know it yet. Hosted by Megan Goodwin and Ilyse Morgenstein Fuerst, two professors whose research and teaching intersect around race, gender, nationalism, imperialism, and religion, Keeping it 101 shows listeners why religion is both a lot more important and a little easier to understand than you might think. Each episode has a topic: a core idea we’re trying to get the audience to think through. We’ve got critique on critique, gender, race, sexuality, and imperial theory. Also jokes. Many jokes.

Public Memory, Place, and Belonging: Unearthing the Hidden History of the Native and African American Presence on Block Island

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Co-Principal Investigator

Amelia Moore 
Professor of Sustainable Coastal Tourism and Recreation
University of Rhode Island

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Co-Principal Investigator

Jessica M. Frazier 
Assistant Professor, Departments of History and Marine Affairs, and the Gender & Women's Studies Program
University of Rhode Island

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Co-Principal Investigator

Kevin McBride 
Associate Professor of Anthropology
University of Connecticut

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Collaborator

Kendall Moore 
Professor, Harrington School of Communication and Media
University of Rhode Island

Our team grant will support fieldwork and planning that will lead to the development of a temporary, traveling exhibition, opening in July 2022, titled “Public Memory, Place, and Belonging: Unearthing the Hidden History of the Native and African American Presence on Block Island.” In collaboration with members of the Gobern family of Block Island and East Providence, scholars at the University of Rhode Island (URI) and University of Connecticut (UConn) are working with the Tomaquag Museum and a number of local museums with an interest in hosting this exhibit, which will include audiovisual content created by award-winning documentarian, Kendall Moore, Native and colonial cultural artifacts, archival and contemporary photographs and images, written records, and interpretive materials designed to provoke audience engagement and reflection. After its initial display at a number of regional museums, the exhibit will eventually find a permanent residence at the Gobern family homestead on Block Island, the future site of a Manissean community center.

Reactivating and Reshaping Humanities Communities: Collaborative Humanistic Inquiry inNineteenth-Century Britain and Today

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Co-Principal Investigator

Christie Harner 
Lecturer in Department of English and Creative Writing
Dartmouth College

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Co-Principal Investigator

Winter Jade Werner 
Assistant Professor of English
Wheaton College

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Collaborator

Sarah Alexander 
Associate Professor, Department of English
University of Vermont

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Collaborator

Carolyn Betensky 
Professor, Department of English
University of Rhode Island

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Collaborator

Patricia Burdick 
Assistant Director for Special Collections
Colby College

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Collaborator

Carolyn Dever 
Professor, Department of English
Dartmouth College

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Collaborator

Hilary Moss 
Professor of History and Black Studies
Amherst College

“Reactivating and Reshaping Humanities Communities: Collaborative Humanistic Inquiry in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Today” takes nineteenth-century communities of humanistic inquirers (working men’s clubs, libraries, natural history museums, the first mass distance learning program, the Boy Scouts) as inspiration to rethink humanities education. What institutions, in the nineteenth-century and today, complicate or help to redefine the function of the humanities? How might public humanities projects, specifically those engaged with nineteenth-century Britain, reactivate learning communities within and beyond the university: on campus, in local organizations, and online? What humanistic projects do participants want to pursue? What histories of humanistic inquiry might we find in the records of our communities? Building to a Spring 2021 symposium, the project involves identifying colleagues and partners across NEHC institutions who can guest lecture in classes (sharing expertise and bringing in new definitions of the humanities) and collaborating with off-campus partners to broaden definitions of humanities social impact.

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