2019

The NEHC is pleased to announce the winners of the 2019 Request for Proposals. These are competitive seed grants for research initiatives in the humanities that seek to capitalize on the collaborative network of the Consortium.

Building a New England Digital Humanities Consortium: A Workshop on the Potential for Shared Digital Tools and Resources

Co-Principal Investigator

Eleanor Harrison-Buck 
Professor, Anthropology
University of New Hampshire

Co-Principal Investigator

Stephen Trzaskoma 
Professor; Classics, Humanities, and Italian Studies
University of New Hampshire

Co-Principal Investigator

R. Scott Smith 
Professor; Classics, Humanities, and Italian Studies
University of New Hampshire

Co-Principal Investigator

Anke Finger 
Professor; German Studies, Media Studies, and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies
University of Connecticut

Building a New England Digital Humanities Consortium: A Workshop on the Potential for Shared Digital Tools and Resources is a summer workshop designed to 1) showcase cutting-edge digital projects, tools and resources from the NEHC; 2) brainstorm ways to make these projects, tools and resources more widely available to member institutions; and 3) build on the NEHC’s existing strengths by developing a strong network of DH practitioners in New England and a shared digital repository featuring the collaborative, interdisciplinary research and instruction for which the humanities are so well known. The workshop will take place in summer 2019.

Race and Identity Matters (RIM)

Principal Investigator

Kerill O’Neil
Julian D. Taylor Professor, Classics
Colby College

Race and Identity Matters (RIM) seeks to build a mutually supportive, intellectually stimulating network between scholars working on race and identity across all NEHC campuses. The first step to launching this network is a one-day symposium, to be held in February 2020. At this first RIM meeting, the focus is on highlighting the range of work on race and identity at NEHC schools, and allowing individual scholars to recognize potential areas for collaboration. Subsequent steps following the symposium include the RIM Summer Institute and a RIM Scholarship in NEHC classrooms project.

William Apess’s Eulogy on King Philip

Principal Investigator

Martin Blatt 
Professor the Practice, History Department
Northeastern University

Collaborator

Lisa Brooks 
Professor of English and American Studies
Amherst College
A member of the Abenaki Nation, Brooks is the author of Our Beloved Kin.

Collaborator

Colin Calloway 
John Kimball, Jr. 1943 Professor of History and Professor of Native American Studies
Dartmouth College

Collaborator

Kellie Carter Jackson
Knafel Assistant Professor of Humanities; Assistant Professor of Africana Studies
Wellesley College

Collaborator

Nancy Shoemaker 
Professor of History
University of Connecticut

William Apess’s Eulogy on King Philip is a public reading and panel discussion that seeks to bring together Native Americans from all over New England to critically address the history of the conversion of Native American to Christianity, King Philip’s War, and William Apess’ Eulogy on King Philip.

In spring 2020, the project will convene a public event hosted by the Massachuset Tribe at Ponkapoag. The event will be held at the First Parish Church in Harvard Square, Cambridge. The evening program will begin with a brief introduction by Lisa Brooks framing the central issues of the evening followed by a reading of an edited version of the Apess eulogy by Native American readers. The reading will be followed by a meal of Native American food and then a panel discussion. This program is inspired by the highly successful public readings/discussions of Frederick Douglass's The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro, which have been sponsored by MASS Humanities for the past decade.